Pupil Premium and Service Premium at STRS

Sir Thomas Rich’s School receives a sum of money from the government called the Pupil Premium Grant. The purpose of the Pupil Premium Grant is to help address the inequalities between those pupils in receipt of free school meals, looked after children, service personnel and their peers.

We use the funding gained from the Pupil Premium Grant to support a range of students. The funding allocated to Sir Thomas Rich’s focuses on supporting pupils to raise their academic achievement and improve pupil participation in extra-curricular activities.

We are required to publish how much Pupil Premium Grant we receive, and its allocation within our school. Please find below the School’s Pupil Premium Policy, the impact of the Pupil Premium Grant for 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16 and the planned Pupil Premium expenditure for 2016/17.

A higher level of Pupil Premium Grant (called Pupil Premium Plus) is available for pupils who have been adopted from care. If you would like more details about this, please contact the Headmaster.

Key Information

Pupil Premium Lead: Mr R M Davies (Key Stage 3 Manager)
Governor Link: Mr Alan Pilbeam

  • Number of Pupils on Role - 997
  • % of Pupils eligible for PPG – 3.8% (figures from DfE September 2016)
  • Amount of PPG received per pupil - £935 (£300 service premium)
  • Total amount of PPG received - £21,505
  • Pupil Premium Policy - PDF Document

Finance for 2016-17

23 pupils @ £935 = Total £21,505 (figures from DfE in September 2016)

Attainment of Pupil Premium Pupils during academic year 2015-16

Year 7


The Year 7 Pupil Premium Pupils (PPP) attainment closely followed that of their peers. There was just one slight dip in performance around Order 4, however, that was corrected by the end of the year. The average progress attainment for the PPP was one level.

Year 8


The Year 8 PPP attainment data suggests that their achievements are in line with their peers and that there is no gap in attainment up to Order period 2. Although all pupils’ attainment rose consistently towards the end of the year, the PPP finished one sub-level below that of the rest of the cohort.

Year 9


The Year 9 PPP matched the attaintment of their peers throughout the year.

Year 10


All the Year 10 PPP sat the Religious Studies Examination (Short Course) in 2015/16. As can be seen from the results below, there were pleasing outcomes for all the pupils with attainment at 100% A-B

Year 11


It is pleasing to see that the PPP amassed a total of 33 A*/A grades in their GCSE results and all PPP achieved 100% A*-C grades. The total figures were slightly down in comparison to that of their peers when looking at the value added for the FFTB data, but no PPP achieved below a C grade. The main areas of spend for the Year 11 pupils was one-to-one tuition and assistance with funding for GCSE coursework. This has had a positive impact on the pupils and their outcomes.

Discretionary Bursary - Year 12


Discretionary Bursary - Year 13


2015-16 Spend: £21,257

2016-17 Spending Forecast using information from the 2015/16 spend

Year Group Type of Spend Outcome
Y7-9 Focus Group Small classes to develop all aspects of English writing
All Years Individual Tuition Subject teacher individual tuition will improve areas of under attainment or lack of confidence.
All Years Trips / Enrichment To enrich the pupils’ educational experience
All Years Literature Improve literacy and opportunities for reading. Provide revision materials
All Years Music Access to music
All Years Electrical items Laptops, printers etc which are used to improve the quality of work produced
All Years Stationary / Ink Allowing school work to be printed off / completed to high standard
All Years Access to sport Access to school gym / teams to maintain health and fitness
All Years Pupils Premium Lead One-to-one meetings, data analysis, interventions
All Years Access to Open Days To promote / support entry higher education
New Y7 standard level of contribution (£827 per pupil) Uniform, PE/Games kit, laptop, two residential trips, two curriculum trips, calculator, geometry set. To support the pupils in their first year at secondary school

Not all interventions can be monitored using quantifiable data. An important aspect of our intervention scheme is the development of social skills and self-confidence. Pupils meet with the Pupil Premium Lead to determine whether the intervention has achieved its desired aim. All pupils last year suggested that they made progress as a direct result of the intervention.

Twice per year, every PPP meets with the Pupil Premium Lead to monitor and evaluate interventions and discuss how best to spend their grant. This year, PPP who are making excellent progress in all areas, which suggests that they do not require an academic or social skills intervention, will be supported by having access to the top universities via open days and talks in order to raise their aspirations and confirm their capabilities. In 2015-16, £120 of the PPG was used to fund the attendance of upper school pupils to a psychology conference to boost their knowledge in the topic area. The opportunity to visit the conference was reflected in their A-Level outcomes. 2A*, 1A, 1B.

Finances for 2015-16

21 pupils PPG x £935 = £19,635
5 pupils SP x £300 = £1,500
Total £21,135

Finances - April 2016

3 pupils into Y12 - £2805 + 2 Y7 pupils £1870 Total £20,200

Attainment of Pupil Premium Pupils during academic year 2014-15

Year 7


The Year 7 Pupil Premium Pupils (PPP) attainment closely followed that of their peers. There was just one sub-level difference by the end of the year. The average progress attainment for the PPP was two sub-levels.

Year 8


The Year 8 PPP attainment data suggests that their achievements are in line with their peers and that there is no gap in attainment. All pupils’ attainment rose consistently throughout the year making just over two sub-levels of progress.

Year 9


Again, when looking at the Year 9 PPP achievement mirrors that of their peers. There was a slight dip around Order period 4, but excellent progress was made in Order period 5 and Order period 6. The PPP ended the year having made two sub-levels of progress.

Year 10


The Year 10 PPP data shows that from Order period 2, there is a visible gap of around half a grade difference between the PPP and their peers. The gap is maintained until after the Year 10 examination. After the Year 10 examination, we see positive progress and encouraging results at the end of the academic year where the gap is almost eradicated. Around the time of the sharp rise in attainment, the interventions would have been making a positive impact.

Year 11


The Year 11 PPP data shows that they have made excellent progress throughout the year. Order period 6 from the previous year (Year 10) suggests that there is a gap of over half a grade between sets of pupils. However, from Order period 1 (Year 11) onwards, the PPP outperform their peers, notably in their Year 11 Trial examinations and with their predicted GCSE grades.

2015 GCSE Value Added PPP v non PPP scores

  FFTB FFTD Average Points Average Grade
Pupil Premium +0.88 +0.54 7.38 A
Non Pupil Premium +0.72 +0.57 7.11 A


2015-16 Spend

Year Group Type of Spend Reason Cost % of PPG Spend
Y7-9 Focus Group Small Classes to develop all aspects of English writing £2,142 17.4%
All Years Individual Tuition Subject teacher individual tuition will improve areas of under attainment or lack of confidence. £3600 22%
All Years Trips / Enrichment To enrich the pupils’ educational experience £440 3.57%
All Years Literature Improve literacy and opportunities for reading. Provide revision materials £82 0.66%
All Years Music Access to music £1482.24 12%
All Years Electrical items Laptops, printers etc which are used to improve the quality of work produced £300 2.43%
All Years Stationary / Ink Allowing school work to be printed off / completed to high standard £168 1.36%
Y9 Access to sport Access to school gym / teams to maintain health and fitness £296 2.40%
All Years Pupils Premium Lead One-to-one meetings, data analysis, interventions £2600 21.10%
All Years Access to Open Days To promote / support entry higher education £38 0.30%
Y11 Hospital Education To allow access to a private tutor £935 7.59%
Total: £12,318.24
Funds remaining for future projects: £9752


In order to narrow the gap between the attainment of PPP and the rest of the cohort in the Year 11 Trial examinations, PPP were interviewed and intervention strategies identified and implemented within the first 6 weeks of the new school year, 2015-16.

Not all interventions can be monitored using quantifiable data. An important aspect of our intervention scheme is the development of social skills and self-confidence. Pupils meet with the Pupil Premium Lead to determine whether the intervention has achieved its desired aim. All pupils last year suggested that they made progress as a direct result of the intervention.

Three times per year, every PPP meets with the Pupil Premium Lead to monitor and evaluate interventions and discuss how best to spend their grant. This year, PPP who are making excellent progress in all areas, which suggests that they do not require an academic or social skills intervention, will be supported by having access to the top universities via open days and talks in order to raise their aspirations and confirm their capabilities.

Impact of 2013-14 Pupil Premium expenditure

Year 7


Pupil Premium Pupils’ (PPP) attainment closely followed that of all other Year 7 pupils throughout the year. Order period 5 was a particular high point in which all pupils were at the same level. However, in Order 6, the attainment of PPP was slightly lower.


It is clear to see from the target trend data, that PPP are making progress in line with that of their peers. The ‘dip’ in Order 6 occurred when pupils’ targets were increased by one sub-level.

Year 8


The attainment trend for Year 8 shows that the attainment gap at the end of Year 7 was closed as early as Order period 2 (end of term one). From there on, the gap remained completely closed, and all pupils finished on, or around, a National Curriculum Level of 6a


The target trend data for Year 8 shows that there was a slight attainment gap developing between PPP and the rest of the cohort for Order periods 1 and 2. However, when pupils’ new targets were increased by one sub-level (Order 3) they outperformed their peers and showed significant progress across Order periods 4 and 5. When the new sub-level targets were increased again (Order 6), attainment across the year group is lower. However, PPP remain ahead of their peers.

Year 9


The attainment trend for Year 9 PPP is very similar to that of all other pupils in the year group. Attainment steadily rose throughout the Order periods, and every PPP ended the year with an average National Curriculum Level of 7c.


Year 9 PPP began the year slightly ahead of their peers. However, a gap opened up after Order period 2 when pupils’ attainment targets were increased by one sub-level. The attainment of PPP remains similar to that of their peers and by the end of the final Order period, it is equal.

Year 10


The Year 10 PP data shows a sharp increase in attainment following the transition from Year 9. This increase is sustained for the next two Order periods. In Order 3, and in the internal Year 10 examinations, PPP outperform the rest of the cohort. However, Orders 5 and 6 show a slight lowering of attainment. In 2014-15, PPP will be interviewed as soon as Year 10 examination results are published. This will enable appropriate support and interventions to be identified and monitored so that the progress and attainment of PPP remains similar to, or exceeds, that of their peers.


PPP who sat public examinations in English and Maths (2013-14) achieved 86% A*/A grades. The target trend data suggests that the PPP make sustained progress for Order periods 1-3. Post internal examination Order periods see a fluctuations in attainment for all pupils including those that are supported by the PP.

Year 11


From looking at the data produced for the Year 11 PPP, it is evident that it mirrored that of the rest of the cohort. It is pleasing to see that the actual grades achieved from the PPP is above that of their predicted grades. However, the dip in trial examination performance is clearly visible. This could be down to the timings of the interventions received by the PPP. In 2014-15 the PPP have been interviewed and interventions have been put in place within the first 6 weeks of the new school year. We hope that this will reverse the trend for this year’s Year 11 PP cohort.


In order to narrow the gap between the attainment of PPP and the rest of the cohort in the Year 11 Trial examinations, PPP were interviewed and intervention strategies identified and implemented within the first 6 weeks of the new school year, 2014-15.

The Impact of Pupil Premium 2012 - 2013 on academic performance

In the academic year 2012 – 2013 there were three pupils eligible to receive Pupil Premium in year 11 in 2012-13. Each of these pupils gained at least 9 GCSEs at A*-C including English and Mathematics and all made expected progress in English and Mathematics. Contextual value added for Pupil Premium pupils was 15.4% compared to 16.4% for pupils not eligible to receive the Pupil Premium (according to Fischer Family Trust).

All three pupils who were eligible for the pupil premium in year 10 during 2012-13 took early entry English Language IGCSE. All gained a grade A. They also each took a short course GCSE in Religious Studies and each of them gained at least grade B.

In Year 9 in 2012-13 there were four pupils eligible to receive the Pupil Premium. The attainment of the Pupil Premium group rose at an almost identical rate to that of the whole cohort. Although the attainment of pupils in this group was slightly below their targets (based on National Curriculum levels at the end of Key Stage 3) this gap had narrowed by the end of year 9.