Pupil Premium Summary

Sir Thomas Rich’s School receives a sum of money from the government called the Pupil Premium Grant. The purpose of the Pupil Premium Grant is to help address the inequalities between those pupils in receipt of free school meals, looked after children, service personnel and their peers.

We use the funding gained from the Pupil Premium Grant to support a range of students. The funding allocated to Sir Thomas Rich’s focuses on supporting pupils to raise their academic achievement and improve pupil participation in extra-curricular activities. We are required to publish how much Pupil Premium Grant we receive and its allocation within our school.

Please find below the School’s Pupil Premium Policy, the impact of the Pupil Premium Grant for 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16, 2016/17, 2017/18, 2018/19, 2019/20 and the planned Pupil Premium expenditure for 2020/21.

Key Information

Sir Thomas Rich’s School will receive £955 per pupil for the academic year 2020/21. The breakdown of the funding is as follows:

Pupil Premium Lead: Mr R M Davies (Key Stage 3 Manager)
Governor Link: Mr Alan Pilbeam

  • Number of Pupils on Role - 1101 (inc Sixth Form as of 6 October 2020)
  • % of Pupils eligible for PPG – 2.54 % (25 pupils)
  • Amount of PPG received per pupil - £955 (x 25 = £24,875)
  • Total amount of SPG received per pupil - £310 (x 11 pupils = £3,410)
  • Total amount received for LAC - £2,345
  • Pupil Premium Policy - PDF Document

Details for 2020-21

Achievement for Academic Year ending July 2020 for pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium

Year 7

Individual Pupils' Progress

Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress


Year 8

Individual Pupils' Progress

Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress


Year 9

Individual Pupils' Progress

Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress


Year 10

Individual Pupils' Progress

Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress


GCSE

A Level
Analysis

As can be seen from the data below for each of the year groups, it has been difficult to ascertain a complete year’s progress due to the lockdowns imposed on schools. The signs for each of the year groups was encouraging apart from Year 10 who had taken a slight dip, but as seen with previous years’, the interventions put in place would have made up the lost ground. The GCSE results, although being centre assessed grades, showed that the gap between Pupil Premium pupils and the rest of the cohort for Attainment 8 was eradicated and the Progress 8 gap just 0.05. The Pupil Premium Pupils were significantly above the national average for both measurements. The A Level results were equally pleasing with the Pupil Premium Pupils scoring an average of +1.3 points per A Level above the rest of the cohort. In term of A*-C success, the Pupil Premium pupils were +3% higher than the rest of the cohort.

Not all interventions can be monitored using quantifiable data. An important aspect of our intervention scheme is the development of social skills and self-confidence. Pupils meet with the Pupil Premium Lead to determine whether the intervention has achieved its desired aim. All pupils last year suggested that they made progress as a direct result of the intervention.

Twice per year, every PPP meets with the Pupil Premium Lead to monitor and evaluate interventions and discuss how best to spend their grant. This year, PPP who are making excellent progress in all areas, which suggests that they do not require an academic or confidence building intervention, will be supported by having access to technology to produce a higher standard of work as well as uniform, and assistance with transport.

Lockdown Plan

Pupil Premium pupils have a daily allowance of £2.50 to spend at the school canteen. As the pupils were not at school due to isolation, no transport, distance from school, it was important that we continued with our support. We supported the families from March through to the end of August with £100 cheques per month to help buy the essentials. The feedback from this approach was very positive. Since lockdown we have increased the daily allowance from £2.50 to £3.00.

Rationale behind issuing currency and allowing choice

  • Allows parents’ choice
  • Paid directly into the parent’s bank account
  • Trackable when cashed

Reason for not using vouchers

  • We may end up purchasing vouchers for stores that are empty of food (note: specific diets and religious observations)
  • We may end up purchasing vouchers for stores that are difficult to get to and may end up costing more to attend.
Research shows that allowing choice empowers people

“That’s the best way to do it (choice) rather than the strict list of things that you can only use for Pupil Premium, it is really nice, it’s freeing.” (STRS Parent).

“The dynamics are different and you’re the one that is in control …and having that freedom.” (Spandler & Vick, 2005).

Why we have historically used the premium to enrich other aspects of pupils lives other than academic prowess

STRS 2015

“Not all interventions can be monitored using quantifiable data. An important aspect of our intervention scheme is the development of social skills and self-confidence. Pupils meet with the Pupil Premium Lead to determine whether the intervention has achieved its desired aim. All pupils last year suggested that they made progress as a direct result of the intervention.”

The DfE now share our vision

“Evidence suggests that pupil premium spending is most effective when schools use a tiered approach, targeting spending across the following 3 areas below but focusing on teaching quality - investing in learning and development for teachers.”

Teaching

Schools arrange training and professional development for all their staff to improve the impact of teaching and learning for pupils.

Academic support

Schools should decide on the main issues stopping their pupils from succeeding at school and use the pupil premium to buy extra help.

Wider approaches

This may include non-academic use of the pupil premium such as:

  • school breakfast clubs
  • music lessons for disadvantaged pupils
  • help with the cost of educational trips or visits
  • speech and language therapy
  • Schools may find using the pupil premium in this way helps to:
  • increase pupils’ confidence and resilience
  • encourage pupils to be more aspirational
  • benefit non-eligible pupils

Recent research is starting to indicate that the person as a whole needs to be grown- not just their academic prowess. From our evidence, the wider interventions that give the pupils opportunities to grow have the biggest positive impact on their confidence and self-worth.

“They (the PPP) don’t have very many life experiences, they’re born in this area, they die in this area.” (Morris & Dobson, 2020)

“Their (the PPP) culture might be narrower than someone who is open to lots of different opportunities and open to a lot more influences.” (Barrett, 2018) (Gerstein interviewee)

How do we compare with other schools?

The DfE and Education Endowment Foundation produce data that compares the Pupil Premium results with that of schools of similar intake, they call this a family of schools. Sir Thomas Rich’s sits in the upper third of the family of schools:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk

Probable spend for 2020-2021

Year Group

Type of Spend

Outcome

Cost Estimate (£)

Year 7-9

Focus Group- English  

Small classes to develop all aspects of English writing

£2500

All Years

Individual Tuition including Focus Groups

Subject teacher individual tuition will improve areas of under attainment or lack of confidence.

£5000

All Years

Trips / Enrichment

To enrich the pupils’ educational experience

On hold

All Years

Literature

Improve literacy and opportunities for reading. Provide revision materials.

£500

All Years

Counselling

Improve access to mental health assistance

£5000

All Years

Music

Access to music

£1500

All Years

Electrical items

Laptops, printers etc which are used to improve the quality of work produced

£2000

All Years

Stationary / Ink

Allowing school work to be printed off / completed to high standard

£500

All Years

Access to sport

Access to school gym / teams to maintain health and fitness

On hold

All Years

Pupils Premium Lead

One-to-one meetings, data analysis, interventions

£2500

All Years

Access to Open Days

To promote / support entry higher education

On hold

New Y7 standard level of contribution

(£975 per pupil)

Uniform, PE/Games kit, laptop, printer, two residential trips, two curriculum trips, calculator, geometry set.

To support the pupils in their first year at secondary school

£3900

Total Estimated Spend

£23,400

Identified Areas of Need 2019-20

Year Group Type of Spend Outcome Cost Estimate (£)
Y7-9Focus Groups (English, Science & Maths)Small classes to develop all aspects of English writing, Maths, and Science proficiency £5000
All YearsIndividual TuitionSubject teacher individual tuition will improve areas of under attainment or lack of confidence.£2000 (put aside)
Y7-11TransportTransport£5300
All YearsTrips / EnrichmentTo enrich the pupils’ educational experience£1000
All YearsLiterature and course materialsImprove literacy and opportunities for reading. Provide revision materials £500
All YearsCounsellingImprove access to mental health assistance£3000
All YearsMusicAccess to music£1500
All YearsElectrical itemsLaptops, printers etc which are used to improve the quality of work producedSee SLC
All YearsStationary / InkAllowing school work to be printed off / completed to high standard£100
All YearsAccess to sport Access to school gym / teams to maintain health and fitness£500
All YearsAccess to Open DaysTo promote / support entry higher education£200
New Y7 Standard Level of Contribution (SLC) (£1027 per pupil) Uniform, PE/Games kit, laptop, two residential trips, two curriculum trips, calculator, geometry set. To support the pupils in their first year at secondary school£10270
  Total estimate - £27,370
(£29,370 if one-to-one used)

Achievement for academic year ending July 2019 for pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium

Year 7

Individual Pupils' Progress

Data for the end of Year 7

Our Year 7 pupils receive a standard level of contribution as soon as they start at Sir Thomas Rich’s. This contains; uniform contribution, laptop, PE kit, scientific calculator, geometry set, and two residential trips. The aim of this is to ensure that they make the best possible start to the year. After each Order period the pupils’ data is analysed to identify areas of need that would benefit from some additional attention; for example a fixed period in the Maths Focus Group to brush up on a certain topic area.

Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress

Year 8

Individual Pupils’ Progress

Data for the end of Year 8

As can be seen from the below graphs, 4 out 5 of the PPP were making at least the expected progress by the end of Year 8. One PPP was making below the expected progress.

Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress

Year 9

Individual Pupils’ Progress

Data for the end of Year 9

As can be seen from the below graphs all five PPP were making above the expected progress by the end of the year. This will have ensured that they had the best possible start to their GCSE years.

Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress

Year 10

Individual Pupils’ Progress

Data for the end of Year 10

It was pleasing to see that 75% of the PPP were making above the expected progress by the end of Year 10, however, one of the pupils was a grade behind meeting their target.

Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress

Year 11

Individual Pupils’ Progress

Data for the end of Year 11

The Year 11 GCSE results show two of the pupils achieved excellent outcomes and three of the pupils’ progress was below the expected level. Two of the pupils however gained places in excellent schools to study the subjects of their choice and this was testament to the help and support they received throughout their time at Sir Thomas Rich’s.

Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress

Year 12

Our analysis of the Year 12 attainment grades including the June examination indicated that disadvantaged pupils (pupils who were either in receipt of Pupil Premium in Year 11 or in receipt of a bursary in Year 12) progressed at a very similar rate to that of their peers. While their attainment and comparisons to target fall slightly behind the rest of the cohort.



Year 13

We continue to monitor pupils who were eligible for Pupil Premium in Year 11 until the end of their A Level courses. The following tables show comparisons between this group (PP) and those who were not eligible.

Value Added for individual Pupil premium pupils:
Key: 
Well above expected progress
Above expected progress
Meeting expected progress
Below expected progress
Well below expected progress

Twice per year, every PPP meets with the Pupil Premium Lead to monitor and evaluate interventions and discuss how best to spend their grant. The parents of PPP are also contacted and asked for their thoughts on how best to use the grant. However, not all interventions can be monitored and evaluated using quantifiable data. An important aspect of our intervention scheme is the development of social skills and self-confidence. For example, the residential trips aim to build resilience and friendships, as well developing an appreciation for the outdoors. Team work and communication are also a focus. The laptop that is issued in Year 7, is aimed at allowing the pupil access to the internet and the ability to further research topics covered in class. This also gives the pupils the opportunity to complete homework and extra study to the best of their ability without having to use public computers, or complete the desired study on a mobile device.

Pupil Premium Map

○ = If required
✔ = Standard Level of Contribution

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Year 12 Year 13
Residential/trips/exchanges
River Churn
Calculator
Laptop
History Trip
Uniform/PE Kit
Maths FG
English FG
Science FG
One-to-one
(Any subject)
Transport
Revision Materials
Coursework Trips
Gym Membership

Estimated Spend for 2018-19

Year Group Type of Spend Outcome Cost Estimate (£)
Y7-9 Focus Groups (English & Maths) Small classes to develop all aspects of English writing £4142
All Years Individual Tuition Subject teacher individual tuition will improve areas of under attainment or lack of confidence. £5000
All Years Transport To allow pupils to come to school £5000
All Years Trips / Enrichment To enrich the pupils’ educational experience £2000
All Years Literature Improve literacy and opportunities for reading. Provide revision materials £100
All Years Music Access to music £500
All Years Electrical items Laptops, printers etc which are used to improve the quality of work produced £1000
All Years Stationary / Ink Allowing school work to be printed off / completed to high standard (this includes professional print booklets in Art) £150
All Years Access to sport Access to school gym / teams to maintain health and fitness £120
All Years Pupils Premium Lead One-to-one meetings, data anlysis, interventions £3500
All Years Access to Open Days To promote / support entry higher education £500
All Years Uniform To promote a higher standard of smart dress £500
Key Stage 3 Counselling - £1200
New Y7 standard level of contribution
£827 per pupil
Uniform, PE/Games kit, laptop,
two residential trips, two curriculum trips,
calculator, geometry set.
To support the pupils in their first year at secondary school £1654 (two pupils)
  Total estimate - £24,866
From £25,740

Achievement for academic year ending July 2018 for pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium

Year 7 (Target -4)

Individual Pupils' Progress

Data for the end of Year 7 shows both the Pupil Premium pupils in Year 7 achieving a higher Progress 8 value (-1.84) than non-Pupil Premium pupils in the cohort (-2.69). Progress 8 scores for all of these groups is higher than national expectations (indicated by the green or blue colouring). Steady progress was made throughout the year:

Year 8 (Target -3)

There were nine pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium in Year 8 of which five received the PPG and a further four received the SPG.

By Order 5 of Year 8, the average Progress 8 for each of these groups were all considerably above the value of -3 which would be expected by the end of Year 8. Maths and English Progress for the PPG group is amber indicating that, while still above expected values, it is an area to monitor closely.

Year 9

There were seven pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium in Year 9. Of these, four received PPG and three received SPG. It should be noted that Year 9 were still assessed using STR Levels last year. These have been translated to new GCSE grades for the purposes of calculating Progress 8 scores but these equivalences are open to question.

The P8 scores for PP and non PP pupils by the end of Year 9 are very similar with a gap of only -0.06.

The PP group of pupils made steady progress throughout Year 9 as demonstrated in the graph above.

Year 10 (Target -1)

There were six pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium in Year 10 – five of these were in receipt of PPG and one was in receipt of SPG. The data below summarises the Progress 8 and Attainment 8 scores by the end of Year 10 for these groups:

The expected Progress 8 score by the end of Year 10 is -1.0 and the PP group (and in particular those in receipt of PPG) fell short of this target.

Year 11 (Target Zero)

Note that the Progress 8 figures shown here are lower than those published by DfE as they include pupils who have no official KS2 figures for whom the School has estimated equivalent values. The table demonstrates all groups considered having positive Progress 8 Scores except those in receipt of SPG (of those, two out of three have positive P8 scores).

Year 12

Our analysis of the Year 12 attainment grades including the June examination indicated that disadvantaged pupils (pupils who were either in receipt of Pupil Premium in Year 11 or in receipt of a bursary in Year 12) progressed at a very similar rate to that of their peers. While their attainment and comparisons to target fall slightly behind the rest of the cohort.



Year 13

We continue to monitor pupils who were eligible for Pupil Premium in Year 11 until the end of their A Level courses. The following tables show comparisons between this group (PP) and those who were not eligible.

29 pupils @ £935 = Total £27,115 (figures from DfE in September 2017)

Estimated Spend for 2017-18

Year Group Type of Spend Outcome Cost Estimate (£)
Y7-9 Focus Groups (English & Maths) Small classes to develop all aspects of English writing £3142
All Years Individual Tuition Subject teacher individual tuition will improve areas of under attainment or lack of confidence. £5000
All Years Transport To allow pupils to come to school £5000
All Years Trips / Enrichment To enrich the pupils’ educational experience £2000
All Years Literature Improve literacy and opportunities for reading. Provide revision materials £100
All Years Music Access to music £500
All Years Electrical items Laptops, printers etc which are used to improve the quality of work produced £500
All Years Stationary / Ink Allowing school work to be printed off / completed to high standard (this includes professional print booklets in Art) £150
All Years Access to sport Access to school gym / teams to maintain health and fitness £120
All Years Pupils Premium Lead One-to-one meetings, data anlysis, interventions £2500
All Years Access to Open Days To promote / support entry higher education £200
All Years Uniform To promote a higher standard of smart dress £500
New Y7 standard level of contribution
£827 per pupil
Uniform, PE/Games kit, laptop, two residential trips, two curriculum trips, calculator, geometry set. To support the pupils in their first year at secondary school Zero - there are currently no new Y7 eligible for PPG
  Total estimate - £19,212
From £27,115

Achievement for academic year ending July 2017 for pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium

Year 7

49% of grades for pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium (Ever 6) are on target or above compared with 69% for the whole cohort. 8% of grades are above target (18% for whole cohort)

Average attainment has risen by around a grade over the course of Year 7 and at a very similar rate to the cohort as a whole.

Year 8

There were four pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium in Year 8.

By Order 5 of Year 8, 62% of grades for these pupils were on target or above (compared to 60% for the whole cohort). 13% were above target (16%). Over the course of the year, the average Attainment Grade for this group of pupils rose by around one sub-level which was almost identical to the progress for the whole cohort.

Year 9

There were five pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium in Year 9.

By Order 5 of Year 9, 56% of grades for these pupils were on target or above (compared to 64% for the whole cohort). 8% were above target (23%). Over the course of the year, the average Attainment Grade for this group of pupils rose by around two sub-levels which was very slightly slower progress than that for the whole cohort.

Year 10

There were four pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium in Year 10.

By Order 5 of Year 10, 61% of grades for these pupils were within one grade of the GCSE target or above – this is the requirement for Y10 (compared to 63% for the whole cohort). 24% were already on or above GCSE target (29%). Over the course of the year, the average Attainment Grade for pupils in this group rose by around a quarter of a grade which was slower than that for the whole cohort.

Year 11

Our internal analysis of GCSEs taken shows that the VA figure for Pupil Premium pupils in Year 11 performed at a very similar level to that of the non-pupil premium pupils. This is fantastic as it shows that the interventions and support made the difference for the Pupil Premium Pupils.

Year 12

Our analysis of the Year 12 attainment grades including the June examination indicated that disadvantaged pupils (pupils who were either in receipt of Pupil Premium in Y11 or in receipt of a bursary in Y12) progressed at a very similar rate to that of their peers. While their attainment and comparisons to target fall slightly behind the rest of the cohort.


Year 13

Our internal analysis shows that the VA figure for those in receipt of bursary was below that of non-bursary pupils.

23 pupils @ £935 = Total £21,505 (figures from DfE in September 2016)

Attainment of Pupil Premium Pupils during academic year 2015-16

Year 7

The Year 7 Pupil Premium Pupils (PPP) attainment closely followed that of their peers. There was just one slight dip in performance around Order 4, however, that was corrected by the end of the year. The average progress attainment for the PPP was one level.

Year 8

The Year 8 PPP attainment data suggests that their achievements are in line with their peers and that there is no gap in attainment up to Order period 2. Although all pupils’ attainment rose consistently towards the end of the year, the PPP finished one sub-level below that of the rest of the cohort.

Year 9

The Year 9 PPP matched the attaintment of their peers throughout the year.

Year 10

All the Year 10 PPP sat the Religious Studies Examination (Short Course) in 2015/16. As can be seen from the results below, there were pleasing outcomes for all the pupils with attainment at 100% A-B

Year 11

It is pleasing to see that the PPP amassed a total of 33 A*/A grades in their GCSE results and all PPP achieved 100% A*-C grades. The total figures were slightly down in comparison to that of their peers when looking at the value added for the FFTB data, but no PPP achieved below a C grade. The main areas of spend for the Year 11 pupils was one-to-one tuition and assistance with funding for GCSE coursework. This has had a positive impact on the pupils and their outcomes.

Discretionary Bursary - Year 12

Discretionary Bursary - Year 13

2015-16 Spend: £21,257

2016-17 Spending Forecast using information from the 2015/16 spend

Year Group Type of Spend Outcome
Y7-9 Focus Group Small classes to develop all aspects of English writing
All Years Individual Tuition Subject teacher individual tuition will improve areas of under attainment or lack of confidence.
All Years Trips / Enrichment To enrich the pupils’ educational experience
All Years Literature Improve literacy and opportunities for reading. Provide revision materials
All Years Music Access to music
All Years Electrical items Laptops, printers etc which are used to improve the quality of work produced
All Years Stationary / Ink Allowing school work to be printed off / completed to high standard
All Years Access to sport Access to school gym / teams to maintain health and fitness
All Years Pupils Premium Lead One-to-one meetings, data analysis, interventions
All Years Access to Open Days To promote / support entry higher education
New Y7 standard level of contribution (£827 per pupil) Uniform, PE/Games kit, laptop, two residential trips, two curriculum trips, calculator, geometry set. To support the pupils in their first year at secondary school

Not all interventions can be monitored using quantifiable data. An important aspect of our intervention scheme is the development of social skills and self-confidence. Pupils meet with the Pupil Premium Lead to determine whether the intervention has achieved its desired aim. All pupils last year suggested that they made progress as a direct result of the intervention.

Twice per year, every PPP meets with the Pupil Premium Lead to monitor and evaluate interventions and discuss how best to spend their grant. This year, PPP who are making excellent progress in all areas, which suggests that they do not require an academic or social skills intervention, will be supported by having access to the top universities via open days and talks in order to raise their aspirations and confirm their capabilities. In 2015-16, £120 of the PPG was used to fund the attendance of upper school pupils to a psychology conference to boost their knowledge in the topic area. The opportunity to visit the conference was reflected in their A-Level outcomes. 2A*, 1A, 1B.

21 pupils PPG x £935 = £19,635
5 pupils SP x £300 = £1,500
Total £21,135

Finances - April 2016

3 pupils into Y12 - £2805 + 2 Y7 pupils £1870 Total £20,200

Attainment of Pupil Premium Pupils during academic year 2014-15

Year 7

The Year 7 Pupil Premium Pupils (PPP) attainment closely followed that of their peers. There was just one sub-level difference by the end of the year. The average progress attainment for the PPP was two sub-levels.

Year 8

The Year 8 PPP attainment data suggests that their achievements are in line with their peers and that there is no gap in attainment. All pupils’ attainment rose consistently throughout the year making just over two sub-levels of progress.

Year 9

Again, when looking at the Year 9 PPP achievement mirrors that of their peers. There was a slight dip around Order period 4, but excellent progress was made in Order period 5 and Order period 6. The PPP ended the year having made two sub-levels of progress.

Year 10

The Year 10 PPP data shows that from Order period 2, there is a visible gap of around half a grade difference between the PPP and their peers. The gap is maintained until after the Year 10 examination. After the Year 10 examination, we see positive progress and encouraging results at the end of the academic year where the gap is almost eradicated. Around the time of the sharp rise in attainment, the interventions would have been making a positive impact.

Year 11

The Year 11 PPP data shows that they have made excellent progress throughout the year. Order period 6 from the previous year (Year 10) suggests that there is a gap of over half a grade between sets of pupils. However, from Order period 1 (Year 11) onwards, the PPP outperform their peers, notably in their Year 11 Trial examinations and with their predicted GCSE grades.

2015 GCSE Value Added PPP v non PPP scores

  FFTB FFTD Average Points Average Grade
Pupil Premium +0.88 +0.54 7.38 A
Non Pupil Premium +0.72 +0.57 7.11 A


2015-16 Spend

Year Group Type of Spend Reason Cost % of PPG Spend
Y7-9 Focus Group Small Classes to develop all aspects of English writing £2,142 17.4%
All Years Individual Tuition Subject teacher individual tuition will improve areas of under attainment or lack of confidence. £3600 22%
All Years Trips / Enrichment To enrich the pupils’ educational experience £440 3.57%
All Years Literature Improve literacy and opportunities for reading. Provide revision materials £82 0.66%
All Years Music Access to music £1482.24 12%
All Years Electrical items Laptops, printers etc which are used to improve the quality of work produced £300 2.43%
All Years Stationary / Ink Allowing school work to be printed off / completed to high standard £168 1.36%
Y9 Access to sport Access to school gym / teams to maintain health and fitness £296 2.40%
All Years Pupils Premium Lead One-to-one meetings, data analysis, interventions £2600 21.10%
All Years Access to Open Days To promote / support entry higher education £38 0.30%
Y11 Hospital Education To allow access to a private tutor £935 7.59%
Total: £12,318.24
Funds remaining for future projects: £9752


In order to narrow the gap between the attainment of PPP and the rest of the cohort in the Year 11 Trial examinations, PPP were interviewed and intervention strategies identified and implemented within the first 6 weeks of the new school year, 2015-16.

Not all interventions can be monitored using quantifiable data. An important aspect of our intervention scheme is the development of social skills and self-confidence. Pupils meet with the Pupil Premium Lead to determine whether the intervention has achieved its desired aim. All pupils last year suggested that they made progress as a direct result of the intervention.

Three times per year, every PPP meets with the Pupil Premium Lead to monitor and evaluate interventions and discuss how best to spend their grant. This year, PPP who are making excellent progress in all areas, which suggests that they do not require an academic or social skills intervention, will be supported by having access to the top universities via open days and talks in order to raise their aspirations and confirm their capabilities.

Year 7

Pupil Premium Pupils’ (PPP) attainment closely followed that of all other Year 7 pupils throughout the year. Order period 5 was a particular high point in which all pupils were at the same level. However, in Order 6, the attainment of PPP was slightly lower.


It is clear to see from the target trend data, that PPP are making progress in line with that of their peers. The ‘dip’ in Order 6 occurred when pupils’ targets were increased by one sub-level.

Year 8

The attainment trend for Year 8 shows that the attainment gap at the end of Year 7 was closed as early as Order period 2 (end of term one). From there on, the gap remained completely closed, and all pupils finished on, or around, a National Curriculum Level of 6a


The target trend data for Year 8 shows that there was a slight attainment gap developing between PPP and the rest of the cohort for Order periods 1 and 2. However, when pupils’ new targets were increased by one sub-level (Order 3) they outperformed their peers and showed significant progress across Order periods 4 and 5. When the new sub-level targets were increased again (Order 6), attainment across the year group is lower. However, PPP remain ahead of their peers.

Year 9

The attainment trend for Year 9 PPP is very similar to that of all other pupils in the year group. Attainment steadily rose throughout the Order periods, and every PPP ended the year with an average National Curriculum Level of 7c.


Year 9 PPP began the year slightly ahead of their peers. However, a gap opened up after Order period 2 when pupils’ attainment targets were increased by one sub-level. The attainment of PPP remains similar to that of their peers and by the end of the final Order period, it is equal.

Year 10

The Year 10 PP data shows a sharp increase in attainment following the transition from Year 9. This increase is sustained for the next two Order periods. In Order 3, and in the internal Year 10 examinations, PPP outperform the rest of the cohort. However, Orders 5 and 6 show a slight lowering of attainment. In 2014-15, PPP will be interviewed as soon as Year 10 examination results are published. This will enable appropriate support and interventions to be identified and monitored so that the progress and attainment of PPP remains similar to, or exceeds, that of their peers.


PPP who sat public examinations in English and Maths (2013-14) achieved 86% A*/A grades. The target trend data suggests that the PPP make sustained progress for Order periods 1-3. Post internal examination Order periods see a fluctuations in attainment for all pupils including those that are supported by the PP.

Year 11

From looking at the data produced for the Year 11 PPP, it is evident that it mirrored that of the rest of the cohort. It is pleasing to see that the actual grades achieved from the PPP is above that of their predicted grades. However, the dip in trial examination performance is clearly visible. This could be down to the timings of the interventions received by the PPP. In 2014-15 the PPP have been interviewed and interventions have been put in place within the first 6 weeks of the new school year. We hope that this will reverse the trend for this year’s Year 11 PP cohort.


In order to narrow the gap between the attainment of PPP and the rest of the cohort in the Year 11 Trial examinations, PPP were interviewed and intervention strategies identified and implemented within the first 6 weeks of the new school year, 2014-15.

The Impact of Pupil Premium 2012 - 2013 on academic performance

In the academic year 2012 – 2013 there were three pupils eligible to receive Pupil Premium in year 11 in 2012-13. Each of these pupils gained at least 9 GCSEs at A*-C including English and Mathematics and all made expected progress in English and Mathematics. Contextual value added for Pupil Premium pupils was 15.4% compared to 16.4% for pupils not eligible to receive the Pupil Premium (according to Fischer Family Trust).

All three pupils who were eligible for the pupil premium in year 10 during 2012-13 took early entry English Language IGCSE. All gained a grade A. They also each took a short course GCSE in Religious Studies and each of them gained at least grade B.

In Year 9 in 2012-13 there were four pupils eligible to receive the Pupil Premium. The attainment of the Pupil Premium group rose at an almost identical rate to that of the whole cohort. Although the attainment of pupils in this group was slightly below their targets (based on National Curriculum levels at the end of Key Stage 3) this gap had narrowed by the end of year 9.